Tips and Hacks for Travelling in Korea!

Tips and Hacks for Travelling in Korea!

TRAVELLING IN KOREA

So, you’re visiting South Korea. It will be an exciting adventure – but you’re a little apprehensive. What if something goes wrong? How can I make my trip go as smoothly as possible?

We’re here to help. Here’s a list of travel hacks and tips that will help you before you land and after you set foot in Korea.

Before You Arrive

There’s a lot of planning that happens before takeoff. If you do research and prepare ahead of time, you’ll save money and avoid stress once you start traveling.

Pick a less busy time to travel. Tourist season (June-August) means more people and higher prices. We recommend you come in spring or autumn when there are fewer tourists and less expensive flights. And be on the lookout for deals and discounts. 

(Image: Credits to the rightful owner)

Get a disposable/digital camera. Those aesthetic photos take up a lot of space on your phone. Consider getting a disposable or digital camera for photoshoots. Then you can save battery power for messaging and anything else you really need.

(Image: Credits to the rightful owner)

Learn as much Korean as possible. The more phrases you know, the easier your trip will be. You won’t need to rely on a language app so much, and you’ll become more confident speaking with native Koreans. Click here for a short list of free Korean language apps and courses.

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Research Korean etiquette. If you’re unsure about how to behave around local Koreans, then it’s time to do some studying! Learn forms of address, table manners, and other rules. If you make the effort, native Koreans will treat you more as a friend and less like a foreigner. 

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Be smart about your wardrobe. Clothes take up a lot of space in your suitcase. Only take what’s necessary (jackets, socks, etc.). If you’re going to do a lot of walking, pack good shoes or boots. If you forget something, you can always buy it when you’re in Korea.

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Take a book or two. Reading is a great way to kill time during your flight or city commute. If you finish the book/books you brought from home, look for something by local Korean authors. Bonus points if you find a book with both Hangul and English, so you can practice your Korean.

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Enjoy the layovers. Long flights are brutal. Make the most of your stops. Walk around the airport. Buy a caffeinated drink and a good meal. Do some shopping or window shopping. If you’re active now, you’ll be more refreshed when you reach Korea.

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When You’re Here

The following tips will help you save money and make the most of your visit. You’re going to have an amazing trip!

Use the transportation system. Korean public transport is convenient and makes navigating the city a lot easier. Get a T-money card to save money on fares. Download the maps for the buses and subways so you’ll always have them handy. 

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Get the Korea Tour Card or Discover Seoul Pass. Would you like discounts or free entry to tourist attractions? Then buy one of these cards. The Discover Seoul Pass is perfect if you’re visiting many attractions, but it has an expiry date. The Korea Tour Card is better if you’re in Korea for over 72 hours and not doing a lot of tourist sites. 

(Image: Credits to the rightful owner)

(Image: Credits to the rightful owner)

Go to the local festivals. What better way to experience Korea than a traditional festival? You’ll see a side of Korean culture that the major festivals won’t give you. Food, flowers, art…there’s so much to explore at these events! 

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Take advantage of free Wi-Fi. That cute café? The park across the street? The nearby bus stops? All Wi-Fi hotspots. Come here if you want to work or chill without worrying about your Internet.

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Book a tour. Tours are ideal if you’re going to the countryside, where fewer people speak English. It’s also a great chance to meet other tourists and make new friends. Finally, some places – including the DMZ – can only be accessed via a guided tour. We’d say it’s worth it.

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Vegetarians and vegans, be prepared. Maintaining a plant-only/pescatarian diet in Korea might be difficult. Research restaurants to see if they have meat-free options. In the supermarket, check the labels on the canned and bagged food items for animal products. If you’ll be here for a while, maybe consider cooking your own meals. 

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Add hiking/walking to your bucket list. Take your pick from a green space in the city, a beach by the ocean, or a forest in the mountains. It’s free exercise and a chance to take in the beauty of Korean nature. We all need a little extra Vitamin D!

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Don’t be afraid to change your plans. Maybe that museum you wanted to visit is closed. Or there’s terrible weather and you’re stuck indoors. This is your chance to cross something else off your list or to do something completely different. Embrace the opportunity. A flexible traveler is a happy traveler! 

(Image: Credits to the rightful owner)

We hope these tips and hacks are helpful. Even if things don’t work out, remember to look on the positive side and treat everything as a learning experience. You’ll be better prepared next time.


Have a nice trip, Seoulmates! (좋은 여행 해)

Author: Sophia

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